All posts by Jennifer Ress

Hire NJ Paving Contractors to Extend the Life of Your Asphalt Paving

New Jersey winters can be harsh.  With temperature fluctuations between summer-like heat and humidity and prolonged subfreezing cold, many businesses find their asphalt parking areas crumbling and cracking.  The smallest hair-line fissure can allow water intrusion beneath the pavement, setting the stage for potholes, cracks and other driving hazards.  But now that temperatures have risen and are stable, it is the perfect time to speak to NJ paving contractors about repairs and projects.

Proper Maintenance

Maintaining your parking areas and roadways is important to the success of your business.  Deteriorating pavement isn’t only unattractive but can also be costly.  With customers, clients, and transportation partners driving on your grounds, it is important to take steps to prevent vehicle damage.  If it happens on your business’s property, you can be sure that you’ll be responsible for the cost of a repair.

But staying on top of the condition of your property can be easy.  When you choose to work with one of New Jersey’s top paving contractors, you are making a sound investment in your property.  From repairs and resurfacing to full depth pavement reconstruction, improving your property will bring long-lasting benefits.

Pothole Repair

Our experience has told us that potholes have been particularly prevalent in recent years.  Aging pavement has been exposed to quickly changing weather and the fluctuations have caused water to expand and contract often.  The result: menacing pits and gaps in asphalt.  The unpredictability of these trouble spots can cause tremendous damage to an unsuspecting driver’s vehicle.  Cold patch material or stone fill that was used to mitigate the problem for the cold months is not going to provide long-term durability or protection from more water intrusion, so it is imperative that you take permanent steps to repair the hole.

It is also important to keep in mind that if a particular area of your property has had repeated problems, it might be time to bring in a commercial asphalt paver to diagnose the situation and create an engineering plan that doesn’t just cover up old mistakes, but actually addresses the cause of the troubles.  Often, a permanent solution need not involve a complete repaving, but rather an area-specific fix.  One of our professional engineers can provide a choice of solutions to meet your needs and fit your budget.

Milling and Resurfacing

In addition to fixing potholes, now’s a great time to perform milling and resurfacing on your asphalt spaces.  Bringing a clean, level, smooth finish to an older property can be the perfect facelift.  According to industry research, improving parking area pavement will result in higher customer traffic and increase property revenue.  It is no secret that resurfacing a parking area will improve perception of a property, but what you may not know is that it can also save you money.  A properly milled and resurfaced surface will require less street sweeping or maintenance.  There will be less pooling of rainwater and less water intrusion.  Proper asphalt prevents potholes and extends the functional life of the pavement.  A smooth, well-maintained paved area is also much easier to plow during the cold season, bringing your plowing costs down and reducing the amount of down time during winter weather.

Pavement Distress

Another common trouble spot after the winter are crumbling edges.  When asphalt pavement meets concrete or stone curbing, or even meets soft surfaces, like grass or landscaping, the surface can deteriorate. This is sometimes called pavement distress.  The result is unattractive and can lead to other issues.  A commercial pavement specialist can mitigate the causes of pavement distress during the spring and prevent further damage to the paved surfaces.

Hire Top NJ Paving Contractor

Now’s the time.  Contact a top New Jersey paving contractor and get your facility ready, not just for next winter, but for years to come. Call the experts at East Coast Paving at 732-329-3600 to get started on your next paving project.

Ensuring Compliance for Ramps and Railings in the ADA Standards (Chapter 4, Part 2)

The Department of Transportation’s ADA Standards for ramps and railings mandate that any new ramp or railing be constructed in compliance with specific guidelines to ensure that people with physical disabilities can use them safely and easily.

If a person with a physical disability cannot access a building via lift or elevator, an accessible ramp must be constructed. However, ramps should be uniform, predictable, and easy to travel on. That way, those who are using equipment like wheelchairs or scooters can anticipate a safe and convenient traveling experience.

This also means that those who are constructing ramps must comply with specific guidelines in the ADA Standards. All ramps and railings must be constructed within the right dimensions to promote safety and prevent any injury to those using them for travel.

When ADA Standards for Ramps and Railings are Needed

According to the United States Access Board, ramps are mandatory along accessible routes that span changes in level that are greater than ½”. Accessible routes with slopes steeper than 5% must also be treated as ramps.

If the ramp has a rise greater than 6” then a handrail must also be installed on the ramp. The Standards do not require an additional lower rail for children except for ramps within play areas. The recommended height for these lower railings is a maximum of 28” and a separation of 9” from the main rail.

ADA Standards for Ramps and Railings Dimensions

To ensure that ramps remain level and safe for wheelchairs to travel over, the ADA Standards mandate that they be constructed within specific dimensions. This ensures predictability and safety for those that use them to travel in and out of buildings.

Dimensions for Ramps

ADA Standards require ramps to comply with these specific guidelines:

•Slope: To be uniform along a single ramp.

•Clear width: Ramp runs must have a minimum width of 36”. This is to be measured between handrails if installed.

•Rise: The height of a run is limited to 30” maximum, but a ramp can have an unlimited number of runs.

Dimensions for Railings

ADA Standards for Railings include:

•Rise: Any ramp with a rise over 6” must have railings.

•Width: Ramps with rails must have a clear width of 36” minimum.

•Height: Rails must be between 34-38” and at a consistent height along a single run.

ADA Standards for Landings Attached to Ramps and Railings

Landings help people with disabilities rest and change direction when using ramps. ADA standards for ramps and railings require level landings at the top and bottom of each run. The Standards also state that landings should be square or rectangular in shape and never curved.

ADA standards  for ramps and railings require that intermediate landings between runs, where ramps often change direction, be 60” wide clear and 60” long clear. No handrail or edge protection extensions can encroach on this clearing to ensure that there is enough spaces for larger assistive devices like wheelchairs to effectively change direction.

If there is a doorway adjacent to a landing, a door’s clearance is permitted to overlap the landing. However, for increased safety, it is best to ensure that the door swings away from the landing if possible.

Additionally, any landing that could be subject to wet conditions must be designed in a way that prevents water from accumulating on its surface. Examples include outdoor landings subject to weather conditions and indoor ones near pipes. Slopes no steeper than 1:48 may be installed for drainage.

Edge Protection

ADA standards for ramps and railings require edge protection be installed on runs under specific conditions. Edge protection installed on ramp runs helps keep wheelchairs and crutch tips on the surface. Examples include curbs, barriers, or extended surfaces.

Edge protection is not required for ramps higher than 6” that already have side flares, ramp landings connected to an adjacent ramp or stairway, or sides of ramp landings with vertical drop-offs not exceeding ½” within 10” of the minimum landing area. Whether using a curb, rail, or other barrier, they must be constructed so that they could prevent a 4” diameter round ball from passing through any spaces.

Aisle Ramps in Assembly Areas

Assembly areas refer to spaces like auditoriums, stadiums, and theatres. Here, the ADA standards for ramps and railings state that aisle ramps are required to be accessible, but may be exempt from certain handrail requirements. If the seating area is adjacent to an aisle ramp that is not part of a required accessible route, then it does not have to comply with handrail requirements.

Help with ADA Standards

Serving clients in New Jersey, New York and Eastern Pennsylvania, the experienced professionals at East Coast Paving and Site Development are prepared to help you achieve the standards for ADA compliance.

For additional questions about ADA compliance, contact the paving experts at East Coast Paving and Site Development at 732-329-3600 or email info@eccompanies.com.

Read More on this Series

The Ultimate Guide to ADA Compliance: Using the ADA Standards (Chapter 1)

Scoping Requirements and ADA Standards for New Construction (Chapter 2 Part 1)

Construction Alterations and the ADA Standards that Affect Them (Chapter 2 Part 2)

ADA Standards for Floor and Ground Surface Construction (Chapter 3)

Accessible Routes in the ADA Standards (Chapter 4 Part 1)

Why is Pothole Repair for Parking Lots Common After Winter?

It has been a long winter and the road to warmer weather is expected to be paved with more potholes than usual. Since winter’s harsh elements tend to create a perfect recipe for potholes, that is why they are notoriously common in the spring season. Now is the perfect time for property owners to focus on pothole repair for parking lots.

Why is Pothole Repair for Parking Lots Common After Winter?

Parking lot potholes form when water seeps into the cracks in asphalt and then continues the freeze and expand cycle, pushing the pavement upward. Between vehicles running over the crumbling surface, heavy plows and corrosive salt, combined with extreme cold, snow and ice, pavement will start to collapse and chip away, leading to dangerous potholes.

Even the smallest alligator cracks can lead to a pothole after a snowstorm. When it comes to parking lots and asphalt roads, unfortunately potholes are inevitable after a long, cold winter.

In fact, the pothole prognosis for spring 2018 is not pretty, AAA says: “A new AAA survey found that nearly 30 million U.S. drivers experienced pothole damage significant enough to require repair in 2016, with repair bills ranging from under $250 to more than $1000.”

Pothole Repair for Parking Lots: Why It’s Important

Repairing potholes for parking lots is important to prevent the asphalt from further weakening and becoming damaged due to the penetration of water into the pavement layers underlying which can cause further damage and even total asphalt replacement.

Bottom line: Spot a pothole? Repair it as soon as possible to save on bigger replacement costs and add years to the life of your pavement surface.

Prevent Winter Damage with Parking Lot Maintenance

Avoid damage to your parking lots next year by prioritizing maintenance before next winter comes back around. Once winter storms hit and heavy snow falls, it will be difficult to repair potholes. It’s better to evaluate the damage done to parking lots now, after winter season has ended.

Need Reliable Pothole Repair for Parking Lots? Trust in East Coast Paving

When you’re in need of reliable pothole repair for parking lots, it’s important to hire a professional paving company with a solid background, experience and a strong reputation.

Whether it’s protecting your customers and employees from dangerous potholes or ensuring your pavement is maintained before the next harsh winter hits, trust East Coast Paving to deliver reliable, high-quality work on time and on budget.

Serving New Jersey, New York and Eastern Pennsylvania, the professionals at East Coast Paving have the vast experience, equipment and expertise to keep your property safe all year round. For more information about pothole repair for parking lots, please contact East Coast Paving at 732-329-3600 or info@eccompanies.com.

Accessible Routes in the ADA Standards (Chapter 4 Part 1)

There are several kinds of accessible routes a building or facility must have, according to the Department of Transportation’s set of ADA Standards, of which all accessible routes must comply.

Accessible routes are required where there are site arrival points, accessible routes within a site, as well as accessible routes within a building or facility.

According to the United States Access Board, an “accessible route” is classified and defined as “a continuous unobstructed path connecting all accessible elements and spaces of a building or facility.”  Furthermore, it goes on to explain that these accessible routes can also be described as, and include, corridors, ramps, elevators, lifts, and the like.

Overall, accessible routes are all about allowing whatever or whoever travels throughout your site to access other parts and spaces easily via routes or paths.

Site Arrival Points

To meet the ADA Standards, it is a requirement that there is at least one accessible route that leads to accessible facility entrances.

Additionally, these routes must be provided from within the site.

From these site arrival points, there must also be accessible parking zones, accessible passenger loading zones, public streets and sidewalks, and each public transportation stop.

Accessible Routes Within a Site

Similar to the requirements for site arrival points, the ADA Standards require that accessible routes from within a site contain at least one route within the site boundary.

Additionally, this route must also originate from the site arrival points and must connect all accessible on-site buildings, facilities, elements, and spaces.

This is common sense.  If a site is going to have multiple buildings, therefore multiple accessible routes from within the facility’s grounds, it has to lead to or connect something.

Accessible Routes Within a Building or Facility

For routes available for access from inside a building or facility, there are yet another set of rules.

These internal routes must contain at least one fully accessible route that connects all the accessible spaces and elements around it.

Furthermore, for circulation paths, if one is interior, then the accessible route must also be interior.

Additionally, vertical interior circulation routes must be in the same location as stairs and escalators.  It is against the ADA Standards for a vertical interior circulation to be located separately in the back of a building or facility.

Accessible Routes Are an Important Part of Construction Sites and ADA Standards

To ensure that you have the proper routes and structure you need for your site, building, or facility, it is always best to reinforce ADA Standards within your construction team.

So, do your research, play by the rules, and create good, effective, and safe, accessible routes for your site.

An accessible route is all about getting someone from point A to point B.  By following the ADA Standards and making sure your facilities comply with them, it is guaranteed your visitors will get from their starting point to their destination with ease and safety.

Help with ADA Standards

Serving clients in New Jersey, New York and Eastern Pennsylvania, the experienced professionals at East Coast Paving and Site Development are prepared to help you achieve the standards for ADA compliance.

For additional questions about ADA compliance, contact the paving experts at East Coast Paving and Site Development at 732-329-3600 or email info@eccompanies.com.

Read more on this series:

The Ultimate Guide to ADA Compliance: Using the ADA Standards (Chapter 1)

Scoping Requirements and ADA Standards for New Construction (Chapter 2 Part 1)

Construction Alterations and the ADA Standards That Affect Them (Chapter 2 Part 2)

ADA Standards for Floor and Ground Surface Construction (Chapter 3)

ADA Standards for Floor and Ground Surface Construction (Chapter 3)

In construction, floor and ground surfaces are subject to the regulations of the ADA Standards, which form the base of the Department of Transportation.

These standards require specifications for floor and grounding surfaces, which address the surface characteristics, carpeting, openings, and changes in level.

These surfaces can be hazardous, and it is the Department of Transportation’s goal to prevent hazards and make them as minimal as possible.  Hence, these standards were born.

The standards apply to all four major aspects of surfaces:

  1. Interior and exterior accessible routes
  2. Stairways that are part of a means of egress
  3. Clearances that are required
  4. Parking spaces, aisles, and passenger loading zones that are all accessible

Additionally, the standards are based on the three key aspects that contribute to a safe and minimal hazardous surface: firmness, stability, and slip resistant.

As a result, the first and foremost standard is that all surfaces must be stable, firm, and slip resistant.

Slip Resistance

As part of the three major standards for flooring, all surfaces are required by the ADA Standards to be slip resistant.

This means that all surfaces accessible by the public must have some level of resistance to slipperiness to reduce hazards, especially to people with disabilities or injuries.

However, the ADA Standards fail to specify the minimum amount, or, level, of slip resistance a surface must have.  Therefore, there are several protocol tools to help determine or estimate the amount of slip resistance a floor contains.

To comply with the slip resistance regulations, a surface must specify three things:

  1. Surface materials
  2. Textures
  3. Finishes

These three things must be used to prevent slipperiness to the surface, especially in conditions it is likely to face.

To prove that a surface is slip resistant, it must clearly prove the provision of these three things to reduce the risk of hazards.

Firmness and Stability

Secondly, a floor or surface must be firm and stable.

Contributing to the firmness and stability of a surface are four main elements: surface smoothness, carpet, openings, and changes in level.

These elements determine the amount of firmness or stability a surface has, and each is subject to different standards.

First, to provide greater surface smoothness, there are limits placed on openings in floors and grounds by the ADA Standards.  However, they don’t specify the overall amount or level of smoothness a surface requires.

However, it is important to know that rough surfaces such as cobblestones and Belgian blocks can produce hazards and difficulty for mobility aids such as wheelchairs and crutches.

Secondly, carpet standards consist of a specific maximum height and texture a pile can have.

The maximum pile height is half of an inch (1/2), which is measured to the backing, cushion, or pad.

Additionally, the pile texture is required to obtain a level or texture loop, level cut pile, and firm backing.

Openings are subject to a maximum width, where the passage can fit a max of ½ a diameter sphere. 

Finally, changes in level are required to be only ¼ of an inch without treatment, but with it can be ½ if it is beveled with a maximum slope of 1:2.

Additionally, changes above ½ of an inch are required to be classified as a ramp.

Safety First Should Always Be the Motto of a Construction Project

Nothing is more important than keeping your workers and the people walking on your grounds and surfaces safe.

Take precautions and be sure to follow the ADA Standards step by step to ensure that your new facilities truly are the safest they can be.

Help with ADA Standards

Serving clients in New Jersey, New York and Eastern Pennsylvania, the experienced professionals at East Coast Paving and Site Development are prepared to help you achieve the standards for ADA compliance.

For additional questions about ADA compliance, contact the paving experts at East Coast Paving and Site Development at 732-329-3600 or email info@eccompanies.com.

Read more on this series:

The Ultimate Guide to ADA Compliance: Using the ADA Standards (Chapter 1)

Scoping Requirements and ADA Standards for New Construction (Chapter 2 Part 1)

Construction Alterations and the ADA Standards That Affect Them (Chapter 2 Part 2)

Accessible Routes in the ADA Standards (Chapter 4 Part 1)

Construction Alterations and the ADA Standards That Affect Them (Chapter 2 Part 2)

Alteration is something practically all construction sites and facilities undergo at some point or another.

The compliance and standards of these alterations are determined by certain scoping requirements, which are the bases of the 2010 ADA Standards of the Department of Justice and the ADA Standards of the Department of Transportation.

For the additions and alterations of pre existing facilities, the ADA Standards are applicable. 

These standards apply to the elements and/or spaces being altered or added.  Therefore, the extent of which the standards are applied is determined mainly by the project’s scope work.

However, it is important to be aware of the fact that for projects affecting the usage or accessibility to a space that contains a primary function, there are additional requirements and expectations.

So, without further ado, here are the ADA Standards for alterations to existing facilities and which projects apply to them.

What Exactly Is an Alteration?

According to Business Dictionary, an alteration can be defined as a “change that does not affect the basic character or structure of the thing it is applied to” in general terms.

The difference, you might be wondering, between an addition and an alteration is that an addition is welcoming a new space or element to a facility, while an alteration is simply making a small change.

The keyword here is “small”.  As discussed earlier, projects that affect areas containing primary functions to the facility are now subject to new rules and must comply with the ADA Standards for alterations.

There are seven major projects that are classified as alterations:

  1. Remodeling
  2. Renovation
  3. Rehabilitation
  4. Reconstruction
  5. Restoration
  6. Resurfacing
  7. Rearranging

As you might have picked up, the thing that all of these have in common is the fact that they simply change the existing facility for its benefit instead of adding to it or expanding it.

Additionally, things such as maintenance, reroofing or painting aren’t considered alterations, as there is really not much physical change that affects the productivity or purpose of the facility for its own good.

Alterations That Do Affect Usage or Accessibility

The one major requirement that the Department of Transportation ADA Standards set in place for alterations that affect areas of primary functions is that there is a path of travel.

Regardless of whether it is a new addition or an alteration that does or doesn’t affect usage and accessibility, there must be a safe path of travel.

This means that if an alteration affects another function, it still must contain a clear traveling path and now must comply with the ADA Standards for alterations.

Being Comfortable with the ADA Standards Will Result in a Safer and Surer Alteration Project

It is extremely important to ensure that all of your projects and facilities comply with the ADA Standards.

It is never fun to have the Department of Transportation on the back of your construction business and possibly costing you money or getting you into legal trouble.

So, know the expectations set for you, and strive to reach them with excellence and comply with standards for safety and peace.

Help with ADA Compliance

Serving clients in New Jersey, New York and Eastern Pennsylvania, the experienced professionals at East Coast Paving and Site Development are prepared to help you achieve the standards for ADA compliance.

For additional questions about ADA compliance, contact the paving experts at East Coast Paving and Site Development at 732-329-3600 or email info@eccompanies.com.

Read more on the series

The Ultimate Guide to ADA Compliance: Using the ADA Standards (Chapter 1)

Scoping Requirements and ADA Standards for New Construction (Chapter 2 Part 1)

ADA Standards for Floor and Ground Surface Construction (Chapter 3)

Accessible Routes in the ADA Standards (Chapter 4 Part 1)

Scoping Requirements and ADA Standards for New Construction (Chapter 2 Part 1)

In the construction world, there are many standards and requirements that dictate how a job must be done for specific tasks.

Construction work falls under two major categories: the Department of Justice and the Department of Transportation.  As a result, both of these two departments have their own rules and regulations applicable to the construction classified beneath them.

The regulations of the Department of Justice are referred to as the 2010 ADA Standards, and the Department of Transportation’s rules are governed simply by the ADA Standards.

Before beginning new construction under either of these two departments, it is vital to know the rules, regulations, and applications of both.

1. Scoping Requirements

“Scoping” is a term used very frequently in the construction industry, and it refers to the general way a construction job or project is going to be carried out under the signing of a specific contract.

Both the 2010 ADA Standards and the ADA Standards have different requirements for scoping construction.

Firstly, scoping requirements apply to four particular areas of construction.  These are elements, building, facility, and site.

Each is applicable by the Department of Justice’s 2010 ADA Standards and the Department of Transportation’s ADA Standards.

Additionally, there are other scoping requirements for technical provisions and covered elements and spaces that a site provides.

These elements and spaces are parking, means of egress, and plumbing fixtures.

For the 2010 ADA Standards, their requirements are determined by either building codes, design practices, or other factors.

The ADA Standards of the Department of Transportation, on the other hand, list the particular areas, elements, and spaces that are required to be accessible.

2. ADA Standards Application

The Department of Justice and the Department of Transportation both have a set of standards specifically for the application and accessibility of a new construction site.

As for the ADA Standards, requirements apply to all types of facilities, regardless of size or complexity.  This means that all facility sites, from simple, one-building facilities to complex sites containing multiple buildings, are all subject to the same rules.

These application regulations also apply to exterior and interior spaces, as well as all elements a site provides. 

Additionally, whether these sites are permanent or temporary does not matter.  The rules apply to both.

3. Accessibility Regulations

It is important to note that for all new construction, it is mandatory by the ADA Standards that all areas to be fully accessible, which normally means having multiple spaces of the same type.

However, the only three areas not required to be fully accessible or only partially accessible are as follows:

  1. Raised or limited usage spaces
  2. Specific employee work areas
  3. Spaces specifically for scoping provisions of which only particular portions are required to comply

The “particular portions” referred to in number three is areas such as dressing rooms or patient bedrooms, because they are only partially accessible.

Knowing the ADA Standards Ensures Your Construction Work Is Safe, Legal, and Successful

You never want to end up in a situation where you have the ADA on your back because you’ve fallen short of expectations!

Before starting your construction, take precautions and be fully aware of the laws and regulations applicable to your site.

This makes for a happy business, happy customers, and a happy Department of Transportation.

Help with ADA Compliance

Serving clients in New Jersey, New York and Eastern Pennsylvania, the experienced professionals at East Coast Paving and Site Development are prepared to help you achieve the standards for ADA compliance.

For additional questions about ADA compliance, contact the paving experts at East Coast Paving and Site Development at 732-329-3600 or email info@eccompanies.com.

Read more on this series:

The Ultimate Guide to ADA Compliance: Using the ADA Standards (Chapter 1)

Construction Alterations and the ADA Standards That Affect Them (Chapter 2 Part 2)

ADA Standards for Floor and Ground Surface Construction (Chapter 3)

Accessible Routes in the ADA Standards (Chapter 4 Part 1)

John Romeo, Urban Edge Properties

This was the first project I worked on with East Coast Paving. We scheduled a pre-con meeting with the engineer and the East Coast team team to level set expectations and answer questions or concerns. The project was completed per schedule. East Coast communicated with myself and our tenants throughout the duration of the paving project. The end result looks terrific. I look forward to working on future projects with East Coast & establishing a long term working relationship.